Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Google releases Android Q Beta: Settings Panels, Sharing shortcuts and more


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Written by G.Я     3/13/2019 12:29:00 pm  No comments

Google releases Android Q Beta: Settings Panels, Sharing shortcuts and more. Today Google has released Beta 1 of Android Q for early adopters and a preview SDK for developers. You can get started with Beta 1 today by enrolling any Pixel device (including the original Pixel and Pixel XL). Google is expected to reveal more information about Android Q at Google I/O in May.
Google releases Android Q Beta Settings Panels, Sharing shortcuts and more
Google releases Android Q Beta Settings Panels, Sharing shortcuts and more
Android Q brings a number of additional privacy and security features for users, as well as enhancements for foldables, new APIs for connectivity, new media codecs and camera capabilities, NNAPI extensions, Vulkan 1.1 support, faster app startup, and more.
Giving users more control over location
Giving users more control over location
Giving users more control over location
With Android Q, the OS helps users have more control over when apps can get location. As in prior versions of the OS, apps can only get location once the app has asked you for permission, and you have granted it.

One thing that's particularly sensitive is apps' access to location while the app is not in use (in the background). Android Q enables users to give apps permission to see their location never, only when the app is in use (running), or all the time (when in the background).

More privacy protections in Android Q
In Android Q, the OS gives users even more control over apps, controlling access to shared files. Users will be able to control apps' access to the Photos and Videos or the Audio collections via new runtime permissions. For Downloads, apps must use the system file picker, which allows the user to decide which Download files the app can access. For developers, there are changes to how your apps can use shared areas on external storage. Make sure to read the Scoped Storage changes for details.
Foldables and innovative new screens
Foldables and innovative new screens
Foldables and innovative new screens
Foldable devices have opened up some innovative experiences and use-cases. To help your apps to take advantage of these and other large-screen devices, Google made a number of improvements in Android Q, including changes to onResume and onPause to support multi-resume and notify your app when it has focus. Google  also changed how the resizeableActivity manifest attribute works, to help you manage how your app is displayed on foldable and large screens.
Sharing shortcuts
Sharing shortcuts
Sharing shortcuts
When a user wants to share content like a photo with someone in another app, the process should be fast. In Android Q, Google making this quicker and easier with Sharing Shortcuts, which let users jump directly into another app to share content. Developers can publish share targets that launch a specific activity in their apps with content attached, and these are shown to users in the share UI. Because they're published in advance, the share UI can load instantly when launched.
Settings Panels
Settings Panels
Settings Panels
You can now also show key system settings directly in the context of your app, through a new Settings Panel API, which takes advantage of the Slices feature that we introduced in Android 9 Pie.

A settings panel is a floating UI that you invoke from your app to show system settings that users might need, such as internet connectivity, NFC, and audio volume. For example, a browser could display a panel with connectivity settings like Airplane Mode, Wi-Fi (including nearby networks), and Mobile Data. There's no need to leave the app; users can manage settings as needed from the panel. To display a settings panel, just fire an intent with one of the new Settings.Panel actions.
Dynamic depth format for photos
Dynamic depth format for photos
Dynamic depth format for photos
Many cameras on mobile devices can simulate narrow depth of field by blurring the foreground or background relative to the subject. They capture depth metadata for various points in the image and apply a static blur to the image, after which they discard the depth metadata.

Starting in Android Q, apps can request a Dynamic Depth image which consists of a JPEG, XMP metadata related to depth related elements, and a depth and confidence map embedded in the same file on devices that advertise support.

Requesting a JPEG + Dynamic Depth image makes it possible for you to offer specialized blurs and bokeh options in your app. You can even use the data to create 3D images or support AR photography use-cases in the future.

How do I get Android Q Beta?
You can enroll here to get Android Q Beta updates over-the-air, on any Pixel device (and this year Google is supporting all three generations of Pixel -- Pixel 3, Pixel 2, and even the original Pixel!). Downloadable system images for those devices are also available. If you don't have a Pixel device, you can use the Android Emulator, and download the latest emulator system images via the SDK Manager in Android Studio.

Google plan to update the preview system images and SDK regularly throughout the preview. Google have more features to share as the Beta program moves forward.

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G.Я


G.R (prince) జి.ఆర్ जि.आर™.
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